Marriage License Information

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              DALLAS, COLLIN, DENTON, HUNT, ROCKWALL AND TARRANT COUNTY, TEXAS
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 INFORMATION:

          Where:

You may obtain your marriage license at any County Clerks office anywhere in the State of Texas. You do NOT have to obtain your license for the county in which you live or in the county were the marriage will be conducted. If your county is not listed below - call information (1411) and ask for the number for the "County Clerks Office" where you wish to obtain your license.

The main offices in Dallas, Ft. Worth, Arlington, Denton, Arlington, McKinney and Rockwall are listed below. Below are the requirements of each.

When

The hours for most County Clerks Offices for issuing marriage license is Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.. to 4:00 p.m. We do not know of any county clerks office open after-hours.

There is a 72 hour waiting period from when you get a marriage license to when you can use it - unless you get a waiver of the waiting period. See below for a waiver.

The ceremony must be within 30 days from the date the license is issued or you will have to obtain another marriage license.

Waiver of the Waiting Period

It requires a District Judge to obtain a waiver of the waiting period. However, this is not difficult to obtain and no fee is involved - IF you go to the right offices. For waivers of the waiting period in the DFW area, we HIGHLY recommend that you use the downtown Dallas or downtown Fort Worth County clerks office if you are seeking a waiver.

Simply tell the clerk you need a waiver of the waiting period and he/she will tell you want to do.

Cost

A marriage license cost $36. Bring cash, ideally exact amount.

What do you need to bring?

For Dallas, Tarrant and Denton County, you will need to bring one of the following ( you only need one):

$36 Cash
and one of the following:
State photo ID or driver's license - any state
An original or certified copy of your birth certificate
(a non-certified photocopy will NOT be accepted)*
A passport (you do not have to be a US citizen or prove legal residency)

*if you were born in Texas, the County Clerks office can immediately issue you a new birth certificate


How old?

18 years. If under 18, a parent or legal guardian must sign permission. The parent or guardian must bring your birth certificate 18 years. If under 18, a parent or legal guardian must sign permission. The parent or guardian must bring your birth certificate to prove parentage and ID to prove he/she is your parent. A legal guardian must provide prove of guardianship.

If no parent or guardian will sign, you can ask a District Court for permission to marry anyway. This probably will be costly and require an attorney.

Do both have to go for the license?

Yes, unless you obtain an absentee affidavit. Go to the County Clerk's office and tell them you need an "Absentee affidavit" for a marriage license. There is no fee. Anyone can pick it up. Your fiancee then has his/her signature notarized on the form. With that, the other can go in alone for the license. If you are having a hard time with the County Clerk, go to a different county clerk's office (Downtown Dallas or Downtown Ft. Worth are best.)

What about proxy weddings?

The most common instance is when one is in jail or out-of-the-country. Go to the County Clerks office and get an absentee affidavit. The downtown Dallas office is particularly helpful with proxies. You will have to get the other's signature notarized and name someone as a proxy (it can be anyone, man or woman). Once done, only one of you goes in with the proxy form for the other. There is no charge for a proxy form.

Blood Test or physical?

No, Texas does not require a blood test or physical. All you need in one item of identification stated above.

What if we lose or forget to bring the license?

This happens almost every week. Most Justice of the Peace will simply leave no matter how big your wedding. Some ministers will. The officiants listed in our Officiate directory will still conduct the wedding ceremony - but you will have to obtain or provide a marriage license later if you want to insure it is a marriage recognized by the State of Texas. Try to remember the license.
 

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COUNTY CLERK OFFICE LISTING BELOW
 
You may obtain your license at any County Clerks office anywhere it Texas. It does not matter where you live or where the marriage will be at (as long as it is in Texas)

DALLAS:
                    The Records Building  (the building next to the Old Red Courthouse)
509 Main St.
                    Dallas, Texas 75202
Dallas Co. also has outlying offices. These sometimes have limited hours.
                    Call: (214) 652-7559

Ft. Worth:
                    The Old County Courthouse
                    100 W. Weatherford
                    (817) 884-1195

Arlington*:
                    Subcourthouse
                    724 E. Border St.
                    (817) 548-3928

Plano*:
                    Plano Subcourthouse
                    900 E. Park St.
                    (972) 881-3025

Denton:
                    Denton Co. Countyhouse
                    401 W. Hickory
                    (817) 565-8519

McKinney**:
                    Downtown Courthouse
                    (972) 424-1460   Ext. 4134

Rockwall:
                    County Courthouse
                    1001 Ridge Rd
                    771-5141

* You can not obtain a waiver of the waiting period in Arlington and Plano offices

Other less common questions about marriage and marriage licenses:

Who can officiate a marriage ceremony?

What if it turns out the officiant  was not legally authorized to officiate a marriage in Texas? Do we have to have a Marriage License to get married? Same-gender marriage ceremonies?


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(Address of DFW area Clerks Offices)        (What is required for Marriage License)


About Officiants...  Who can legally conduct a Wedding Ceremony in Texas?

1.  Religous officials:
    a.) Ordained or licensed Ministers, Priests, Pastors, Rabbis
    b.) Religious Officials authorized by their religion to conduct
          wedding ceremonies

2.  Most Federal Judges at any level.

3.  On the State and County level -
     Anyone who served as a Judge at most levels  (most municipal judges not included)  if the person:
a.) held judicial office at least 12 years or long enough to tenure in the
           State of Texas Retirement System and
b.) persons with less judicial experience BUT who are presently a judge.

The State does not register or license any person to conduct wedding ceremonies.


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What if the officiant is not legal? How do you know if the judge really is a judge? In fact, many benches - JP or judge - are filled in temporarily on limited assignment and without marriage authority.
How do you know a minister is really a minister?
How do you know your finance didn't just bring in some buddy in case they later want to get out of it?

Actually, you do not really need to worry about this. The Texas Family Code provides that if you believe the person  is authorized, the marriage is valid even if the person officiating the ceremony was not authorized. The officiant could get into trouble, even be prosecuted - but you are still married.
It is known you wanted to get married because you went to get a marriage license. Of all the worries you may have, do not worry if the wedding is "legal" if you have a marriage license and marry within the time frame of the license (at least 72 hours after it was issued, but within 30 days).

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    Must we have a marriage license to get married? There are many definitions of marriage. Specifically, there is a distinction between a government marriage and a non-government marriage. GOVERNMENT & RELIGIOUS MARRIAGE:
For example, many couples will have both a government marriage (with a license) and a religious marriage (the ceremony officiated by a minister, priest, rabbi etc.) GOVERNMENT MARRIAGE ONLY:
Others will have only a government marriage (a license and by a government official such as a judge). RELIGIOUS/SPIRITUAL MARRIAGE ONLY:
Still other couples will opt only for a religious/spiritual ceremony - or a non-religious personal commitment marriage ceremony - without a marriage license. Careful thought should be given in this instance for many reasons. Government marriage? A government marriage specifically means the couple obtains a State of Texas issued marriage license and this is signed by a person authorized to officiate a wedding - ministers, priests, rabbis, and various judges. Personal commitment or spiritual ceremonies without a license? Any person can make any personal commitment they wish to another person, and some same couples essentially create all the elements of a marriage by having a personal commitment (marriage) ceremony - only without a marriage license. Some will use a minister willing to officiate such a ceremony. Others will make such ceremony themselves or use a friend to "officiate" the ceremony.
If the goal is to make the relationship "legal" in a marriage like sense - meaning community property - the couple will simply enter into a written contract stating an agreement to joint ownership of property or some other property division. Why would anyone want a non-government recognized marriage & why are they not illegal? It has only been recently that anyone believed it is illegal for a minister/priest/rabbi to not obtain permission from the government before conducting a marriage ceremony. In fact, this is opposite history.
Originally, all marriage ceremonies were only by religious officials and marriage had nothing to do with the government. Marriage ceremonies were simply recorded in church records.
However later, where there was no religious official (minister) available, the couple could
record that they had married (common law) at the courthouse so there was some record of the marriage - this was the birth of the "marriage license". Additionally, numerous government officials were authorized to sign marriage licenses - governor, mayor, judges, etc.
For thousands of years and to this date many religions and ministers believe marriage is a contract the couple makes only to each other and before God. Still, many Catholic, Baptist, Non-denominational, Fundamentalist, and Eastern religion priests consider that they are only holding a religious ceremony and are indifferent to whether or not the couple also wants it to be a marriage under the laws of the State of Texas - rather than it is a marriage under the laws of God - and if a conflict the couple should follow the laws of God and not the state. However most of these (not all) will sign a government marriage license if asked to. Many Hindu priests actually refuse to sign a government license - and our officiates have been asked to join into such ceremonies in a "civil" role because the couple also wants the marriage to be recognized by the government.
There is a tendency for government to take over what it gets into. However, the government can no more outlaw a minister or priest from conducting a marriage ceremony without government sanction than it could outlaw baptisms, confirmations or any other religious ceremony. The most common instance of a marriage ceremony without a license is when the couple forgot to get it, did not they needed one, or lost it. However, they do not want their wedding day with all the time, expense and travel wrecked because of a goof-up.
Almost no person authorized to officiate a wedding by virtue of being a government official will go on with the wedding if you lost or forgot the license - which can be an unimaginable disaster for a big wedding. Many ministers will still do the ceremony - but it will not be recognized by the state unless the couple obtains a marriage license later, states they still want to be married and the minister signs it.
There is a danger that one of the couple might change their mind during this time, which would raise complicated legal issues. Some couples actually desire a marriage without a marriage license. This ranges from professionals who want a personal commitment - but do not want to fall under government marriage laws. A person can decide whether they want a government marriage - with all the pluses and minuses of it - or a personal commitment marriage without falling under government marriage laws - with the pluses and minuses of that decision. Another reason is because the couple do NOT want community property definitions or lost individuality in the event of liabilities. If they are "legally" married, if one or the other has a legal problem the other could be forced to pay for the mistake. In some ways, when two people marry  they lose their personal civil rights and their legal rights are cut in half.
Under community property laws, often liability is joint if legally married.. Thus if your spouse is sued, becomes seriously in debt etc. - the assets and accounts of the other might be taken for those judgments and debts. In short, some couples want to make a personal commitment to each other - or a commitment to each other before God - but do not want the government to get into the middle of their marriage or to be at risk for actions of each other in a legal sense. Others will opt away from a government recognized marriage for reasons of religious beliefs, philosophy, or other personal reasons. Statistically, the overwhelming majority of seniors (over 65) who live together in a romantic, committed relationship - whose relationship stated when they were seniors -
do not legally marry as their are enormous social security, medicare etc. penalties if they do marry. There is a long list why couples opt not to be "legally" married - but married on a personal-commitment and spiritual level. Why have a government recognized marriage? For most couples, it is wisest to have a license and their marriage recorded with the government - thus falling under government regulation of their marriage.
The primary reason is to protect against ways in which one or the other could become a victim in the event of subsequent conflict. We highly recommend a couple give serious consideration before opting to marry without a marriage license.
The greatest danger relates to children. If the couple do part, the father probably would have a costly and difficult time obtaining visitation or custody rights. On the other hand, the mother would face a far more difficult obstacle to obtain child support if the father skips.
Paternity suits are far more costly and complex than a divorce suit.
Couples who are legally married have certain legal privileges in relation to each other - such as confidentially over what they say to each other (though not over what they do or see - only what they say only to each other). There are exceptions to such privilege - in divorce cases and for allegations of spousal or child abuse.
Married couples tend to have more rights in terms of authorizing emergency surgery.
On the other hand, where it used to be necessary to marry legally to buy a house, many mortgage companies no longer care one way or another - if both sign then both incomes are factored. This is not surprising as statistically over 80% of couples live together before marriage - and the older the couple the more likely this is. Would it illegal for someone to officiate a marriage ceremony without a government license? If the officiate's authority was only as a government official (was not also a minister, priest, rabbi etc. and therefore also non-governmental authority), it would be administratively illegal for them to officiate a non-marriage license ceremony. It would not be criminally illegal, but the government can impose regulations on it's own officials - meaning they could be removed from office.
It would not be illegal for a non-government officiate to officiate a marriage ceremony without a license. Some will. Some will not.
There could be serious consequences if someone officiated marriage ceremony for minors without a license however - particularly if they knew they were minors. It would not be criminal, but there could be major civil liabilities. Will any officiates listed on this site conduct marriage ceremonies without a license? Yes and No.
If the couple forgot to bring the license with them, yes. This happens almost every weekend. If it is clear that the couple have planned the wedding and this is their big wedding day - but they forgot to get the license? Yes, BUT they will explain that the government will probably not recognize the marriage unless they obtain a license, that the license can not be back dated and they both will have to acknowledge to the officiate after he/she has the license and the waiting period past (unless it was waived) before it will be signed. While you think the scenarios of forgetting to bring or get a license does not matter, think again. If you are inviting guests and have a significant wedding - imagine if no wedding occurs? Worse case scenario we heard of in area? A couple had a big family/friends get together - but had forgotten the license. The J.P. refused to do a ceremony of  any kind and started to leave. Some of the guests blocked the door until they could get hold of the J.P.s supervisor (no one supervises a JP). Rather than a wedding, it ended with the JP ordering arrests for kidnapping! That was a ridiculous sequence of events. If troubled by conducting a "marriage" ceremony, the alternative is to conduct a ceremony without pronouncing them to be husband and wife. However, there are many restrictions on JPs that are on the bench and some can be very hard nosed in general.  Probably the officiants listed on this site will not conduct the marriage without a license if the couple are marrying without a license deliberately - unless they both provide a signed statement that they recognize the government probably will not recognize the marriage and they both specifically want to make a personal or spiritual marriage commitment without a marriage license - and the officiate believes they both understand what this means. In tangible terms, this means they also will not do "spur of the moment" ceremonies without a license - though will if it a big wedding and it forgotten or it with realistic fore-thought.. If the reason is the couple simply does not want to bother getting a license, the answer is always no. It is not rare for couples to call at night saying they want to get married "now" without a license - the answer is no and we explain how they can get a license the next day and even get a waiver. Some do just that. Others will say that is too much bother so they just will forget it. If it is too much a bother to spend a couple hours getting a license, they are not ready to make a marriage commitment anyway as marriage involves a lot of bothersome things time to time. They definitely will not conduct a marriage without a license if either of the couple are minors - though this is a problematical decision from a spiritual perspective. What this means in practical terms? If you forget the bring the license, your wedding day will not be wrecked. If you truly want a marriage without a license, to protect both couples and insure this really is a thought-out decision - it will not be spur of the moment and a written statement to that effect will be asked for. Suggestions as to what to do if you opt for a non-license marriage? Write out carefully what you both really are promising to each other - and what happens in relation to your individual property - sign multiple copies and record it at the courthouse as a contract. You should also write out what you are agreeing to if you have children in the future. If we do not have a license, does that mean neither of us has an legal obligation to the other? No, not at all. This is a very complex legal question. Break ups of non-married couples often are treated as "palimony" lawsuits very similar to divorce suits - though they are heard in civil court rather than family court - and fall under contract and common law rather than family law. Generally, civil court is far more costly than family court. If we marry without a license, can we later marry with one? You can get married with a license as many times as you wish. In fact, you both can swear an affidavit at the County Clerk's office backdating the marriage to the date you both committed to each other (check with the County Clerk about common-law affidavits as the legislature can change laws anytime they want).
It is not uncommon for a couple to have a private (or even secret) elopement ceremony (with a license) - and then later have their "Big wedding". They do not have to get a second license for the second wedding and most do not. However, some will so they have a blank license.
If you marry with a license privately, we will keep this secret at your big wedding if you wish. We also have couples who bring license from secret elopement weddings they had earlier in other states - having their big wedding here. We do not require a second Texas license and will keep it secret that you are already married.
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Are same-gender marriages illegal? 
 
(You may notice this begins identical as for opposite-gender marriages without a license page. Same principles are involved in some ways. There are many definitions of marriage. Specifically, there is a distinction between a government marriage and a non-government marriage.

GOVERNMENT & RELIGIOUS MARRIAGE:
For example, many couples will have both a government marriage (with a license) and a religious marriage (the ceremony officiated by a minister, priest, rabbi etc.) Some will have a government marriage on one day and their church wedding on another. A government marriage (with a license) means that the couple decided to make a legally binding contract with each other and voluntarily place themselves under the authority of state and federal laws which regulate government marriages.

GOVERNMENT MARRIAGE ONLY:
Others will have only a government marriage (a license and by a government official such as a judge). These are couples who are marrying for the purpose of placing their relationship permanently under the authority of state and federal marriage regulations presently and however they may be changed in the future.

RELIGIOUS/SPIRITUAL MARRIAGE ONLY:
Still other couples will opt only for a religious/spiritual ceremony - or a non-religious personal commitment marriage ceremony - without a marriage license. Careful thought should be given in this instance for many reasons. However, in some instances it may be the best choice. Generally, it is older couples and seniors who make such decision.

Government marriage?

A government marriage specifically means the couple obtains a State of Texas issued marriage license and this is signed by a person authorized to officiate a wedding - ministers, priests, rabbis, and various judges.

Personal commitment or spiritual ceremonies without a license?

Any person can make any personal commitment they wish to another person, and some couples essentially create all the elements of a marriage by having a personal commitment (marriage) ceremony - only without a marriage license. Some will use a minister willing to officiate such a ceremony. Others will make such ceremony themselves or use a friend to "officiate" the ceremony. Still others do not have any ceremony or ritual - simply make a personal promise to each other and possibly one to God.

If the goal is to make the relationship "legal" in a marriage-like sense - meaning community property - but not to fall under government marriage regulatory laws - the couple will enter into a written contract stating an agreement to joint ownership of property or some other property division. Thus their property issues are resolved in a civil contract under civil law - rather than under Family Code statutes and laws.

Why would anyone want a non-government recognized marriage & why are they not illegal?

It has only been recently that anyone believed it is illegal for a minister/priest/rabbi to not obtain permission from the government before conducting a marriage ceremony. In fact, this is opposite history.

Originally, all marriage ceremonies were only by religious officials and marriage had nothing to do with the government. Marriage ceremonies were recorded in church records.
However later, where there was no religious official (minister) available, the couple could record that they had married (common law) at the courthouse so there was some record of the marriage - this was the birth of the "marriage license". Additionally, numerous government officials were authorized to sign marriage licenses - governor, mayor, judges, etc.

For thousands of years and to this date many religions and ministers believe marriage is a contract the couple makes only to each other and before God. Many Catholic, Baptist, Non-denominational, Fundamentalist, and Eastern religion priests consider that they are only holding a religious ceremony and are indifferent to whether or not the couple also wants it to be a marriage under the laws of the State of Texas - rather than it is a marriage under the laws of God - and if a conflict the couple should follow the laws of God and not the state.

However, most of these (not all) will sign a government marriage license if asked to. Many Hindu priests refuse to sign a government license - and our officiates have been asked to join into such ceremonies in a "civil" role because the couple also wants the marriage to be recognized by the government.

There is a tendency for government to take over what it gets into. However, the government can no more outlaw a minister or priest from conducting a marriage ceremony without government sanction than it could outlaw baptisms, confirmations or any other religious ceremony. Nor could ministers prevent the government from conducting marriage ceremonies. Both can claim the other is wrong, illegal or immoral - but both government and ministers/religious officials can conduct marriage ceremonies without the other's permission or formal recognition.

Some couples actually desire a marriage without a marriage license. This ranges from professionals who want a personal commitment - but do not want to fall under government marriage laws for reasons of property, liability, taxation, or other reasons to remain separate legally - while committed romantically and spiritually. A person can decide whether they want a government marriage - with all the pluses and minuses of it - or a personal commitment marriage without falling under government marriage laws - with the pluses and minuses of that decision.

Another reason is because the couple do NOT want community property definitions or lost individuality in the event of liabilities. If they are "legally" married, if one has a legal problem the other could be forced to pay for the mistake. In some ways, when two people marry  they lose their personal civil rights and their legal rights are cut in half.
Under community property laws, often liability is joint if legally married.. Thus if your spouse is sued, becomes seriously in debt etc. - the assets and accounts of the other might be taken for those judgments and debts. In short, some couples want to make a personal commitment to each other - or a commitment to each other before God - but do not want the government to get into the middle of their marriage or to be at risk for actions of each other in a legal sense.

Others will opt away from a government recognized marriage for reasons of religious beliefs, philosophy, or other personal reasons.

Statistically, the majority of seniors (over 65) who live together in a romantic, committed relationship - whose relationship stated when they were seniors -
do not legally marry as their are enormous social security, medicare etc. penalties if they do marry.

There is a long list why couples opt not to be "legally" married - but married on a personal-commitment and spiritual level.

How does any of this apply to same-sex marriage ceremonies?

You can not obtain a marriage license for a same-sex couple. The State of Texas will not recognize a same-sex marriage ceremony or any other same-sex personal commitment ceremony.

This does not mean that you can not make a personal or spiritual commitment to each other. It simply means the government will not enforce the commitment or consider it a matter for divorce court if it does not last.
Thus, the law will not issue license nor recognize the relationship, but that does not mean the commitment is meaningless to you nor spiritually. Probably no couple, opposite-sex or same-sex marry because they want the government to enforce their relationship. They marry for the personal commitment.

A same-gender marriage can be made "enforceable" legally in many ways, however, but recording a contract between the two - such as property rights, economic duties and so forth. There is a vast distinction between whether a act is not legal in the sense that the government will not recognize it, compared to being illegal in terms of being jailed.

Is there any way to make a same-sex commitment enforceable in court?

It is not uncommon for civil courts to hear cases concerning break ups of same-sex couples - who often have co-mingled monies and property. Some treat it as common-law contract cases, other courts treat them like palimony cases between non-licensed opposite-sex couples.

A same-sex couple (or any two people if they are adults) can contract in writing virtually all issues of property, money and possessions - and the contract binding. The main distinction is disputes would be decided in civil court rather than in family court. If the couple has substantial property, real estate etc., it would be a good idea to have an attorney review the contract.

Another limitation in the "personal contract" is that the contract would have to avoid any issues of sexuality. For example, if a provision provided a penalty if one of the couple was unfaithful to the other, the court would not enforce this. However, generally family courts do not impose unfaithfulness penalties against same-sex married couples either.

Practical terms

Essentially all couples who marry - with or without a license - opposite-sex or same-sex - do so for reasons either of openly declaring a personal commitment and/or to make an open commitment spiritually. The distinction for a same-sex couple is that the government will not recognize the commitment - meaning they will not enforce it. However, enforcement
means dividing up property under the Texas Family Code - which the couple can essentially duplicate in a written legal contract between them.

Would such a same-sex commitment or marriage be criminally illegal?

No. Homosexuality as an physical act is criminally illegal in the State of Texas (there has not been a prosecution in decades, but the Supreme Court has upheld the law so far) and same-sex government marriages are banned.  But that does not mean making a personal or spiritual commitment is criminal as that has nothing to do with the government. No law can outlaw two people from committing to each other regardless of their gender, nor making any spiritual commit they wish - privately or publicly - and a same-gender marriage does not per se prove homosexuality in terms of criminal law.

Marriage and sexuality are not the same question. If a same gender couple marry, the law does not require sexuality within the marriage.

Law also prohibits minors from marrying - but that does not make it a crime if they commit personally to each other to go steady or be together the rest of their lives - rather it bans government marriages without parental consent. The law bans marriages without a license - but millions of couples make lifelong commitment to each other without a license - and the ban is on government marriages with out a license.

The various bans related to government marriage is simply the government regulating itself - not you. The prohibition by the government is that it prohibits itself from issuing a license and it will not regulate your relationship under marriage statutes. That does not prohibit you from whatever personal or spiritual decisions you wish to make.

The government can regulate itself and define what the standards are for a government marriage - just as a church can set requirements for a marriage it would make spiritually "legal" (commonly the requirements are marriage counseling, ages higher than those of government, specific terms of the commitment they make to each other etc.) The only standard of government is 1.) that you are at least 18 unless a parent/guardian agree and 2.) most importantly that you pay a tax - though it is only $31 dollars. Other than this, the government has no interest whatsoever in the quality of the marriage or the commitments that are made.

In simplest terms, you can not have a marriage recognizable by the State of Texas between same-gender couples because the government banned itself from selling you a license. But that does not restrict the personal or spiritual commitment you can make. This is equally true for opposite-gender couples who commit or marry without a government license. 

Would it be illegal for a minister to officiate a same-sex commitment or "marriage" ceremony?

No, for many reason. Texas defines same-sex marriages as non-existent - therefore how could any one conduct such a ritual in a legal sense? There are decisive and complex issues of separation of church and state, free speech and other civil rights. Regardless, the restrict would be that the person not issue a marriage license represented to be a government license or falsely represent that they are conducting a government marriage ceremony - which might be considered then a fraud.

There are many ministers who will officiate such ceremonies. Talk to the local gay-rights or community center for names. They probably will charge a fee for the ceremony. However, particularly if your commitment is also spiritually based, it would be appropriate to have such a ceremony conducted by a minister who recognizes same-sex marriages as 100% real as a spiritual matter.

In our opinion, however, the law would come crashing down on many levels if some officiated same-gender marriage ceremonies for minors - particularly if for a fee - and we would suggest anyone speak with an attorney before considering doing so.

The law recognizes minors as very different from adults for reasons of protection and we would urge any minister and any one else away from officiating any marriage-like ritual for minors where sexuality may be involved even by inference - and a criminal prosecution would be very possibly pursued otherwise.

Will the officiates listed with DFWX officiate same-sex marriages or commitment ceremonies?

Yes. We have both and female officiants who will officiate same-sex ceremonies.

However, we do believe that in whatever a person does - regardless of what others think - the person still should pursue what they see as decent, elegant and their own highest moral codes. Ultimately for your decisions, whom you will most face and will most be your judge is yourself, those people you care for, and God. Whether you are 100% or 100% wrong, at least you can pursue consistency within your own codes. Hopefully, each person will be strive to be true to their highest and best standards. That has nothing to do with what the government's opinion of you is.
 

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Wedding Photography Ministers & Judges for wedding Courthouse Wedding
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